Tag Archives: Archie

Archie Macnaughton

Archie McNaughton, ca.1888-1892
Archie Macnaughton, ca.1888-1892

ARCHIBALD EDWARD (ARCHIE) MACNAUGHTON
(July 26, 1864 – July 1937)

Montréal Amateur Athletic Association (1882-1891)
Victoria Lacrosse Club (1892-1893)
Victoria Capitals (1894)
Victoria Triangles (1895)

Archie Macnaughton (his surname has appeared spelt variously as McNaughton, MacNaughton, and Macnaughton) is an interesting figure in the very early days of the sport in Canada. While he never played in the professional ranks, he was one of lacrosse’s early star players in Montréal – as well as a pioneering figure in the establishment of the game on the Pacific Coast and the rise of the Victoria senior teams in the mid-1890s.

He was born in Lachine, Québec and was a member of the Montréal Garrison Artillery which participated in the suppression of the North-West Rebellion in 1885. The Montréal Gazette called him one of three “crack snowshoers” who were welcomed home by club members.

His Scottish ancestry may possibly be linked to an old family in Glenlyon, Scotland as there is mention of an Archibald McNaughton (possibly his father) in church records at Scotch Presbyterian Church in Montréal, who was born in Callendar, Scotland but grew up near Saint-Eustache in suburban Montréal. However, “Archibald McNaughton” does appear infrequently as a name occurring in early Montréal.

He helped Montréal win a junior championship in 1881 and then turned senior the following year. Macnaughton was widely regarded as one of the best home fielders (attack midfielders in modern language) and one of the fastest sprinters to play the game in his day, with phenomenal speed. He possessed a deadly and dangerous shot, usually taken on a dead run and the ball’s velocity was reported to be stronger in force than that of a baseball player fielding the ball home.

He was the fourth-best goal scorer in the 1886 National Lacrosse Union season with 7 goals in 10 games for the Montréal Amateur Athletic Association. The following season however he was held scoreless in 7 games played. In 1888, Montréal AAA dropped out of the NLU and the league barely staggered to the finish. When Montréal AAA returned to the NLU in 1889, they lost Macnaughton to a twisted ankle in the pre-season. On his return to play, after missing two matches, he still managed to make up for goals to finish second in league scoring with 8 goals in 6 matches.

Archie Macnaughton with Montréal in 1889.

His final season with Montréal Amateur Athletic Association saw him playing the role of Atlas, shouldering the team’s goal-scoring in the wake of the retirements of Tom Paton and W. Hodgson, the two other leading players with the ‘Winged Wheelers’. He once again finished in second-place for goals with 8 scored in 8 games. Montréal AAA would drop out of the National Lacrosse Union again in 1891.

He moved to the Pacific Coast in 1892 and joined the Victoria Lacrosse Club. He played in 3 matches that year, held scoreless in his first two appearances and then scoring 3 goals in his third outing for Victoria. He also refereed two senior league games that same season.

Archie Macnaughton married Miss EM Bishop of Montréal in a ceremony held at First Presbyterian Church in Vancouver on August 11, 1892. They left Vancouver that same day and took up residence in Victoria.

In 1893, as a member of the Victoria club, he helped lead the Capital City crew in victory over his former team, the Montréal Amateur Athletic Association, 6-0 during their tour of the Eastern clubs. The team’s return to their home town that October was met by the city band and a midnight reception which followed at the Driard Hotel. During the senior league season that year, he played in 6 matches and scored 3 goals.

Archie Macnaughton had his best campaign for Victoria in 1894, when he scored 11 goals in 10 matches – finishing off the regular season by scoring 5 of Victoria Capitals’ 6 goals in their rout over Vancouver Lacrosse Club on September 29, 1894. He then bagged another 2 goals in the Capitals’ playoff match played at Brockton Point the following month versus New Westminster. That playoff meeting ended in dispute as Victoria was leading the championship game 3 goals to 2 when the game was called due to darkness. Claiming the championship, the Victoria Capitals then withdrew from the British Columbia Amateur Lacrosse Association on November 2, 1894 in protest of referee indecision in the playoff game and due to New Westminster arriving at Brockton Point an hour and a half late which resulted in the late start.

Macnaughton made only a single appearance for the Victoria Triangles in the 1895 season, which saw him scrape through Victoria’s fifth goal in a 6-2 rout over Vancouver to close out the final game of the season.

AE Macnaughton's signature, showing how he spelt his surname
AE Macnaughton’s signature, showing how he spelt his surname

He played ice hockey for Montréal Amateur Athletic Association of the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada from 1887 to 1892, appearing in 19 games and scoring 21 goals. Macnaughton was the leading goal scorer in the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada in 1890.

In 1888 he had to testify in a libel lawsuit which involved accusations of lacrosse players match-fixing a game.

In the first week of April 1894, he was part of a British Columbia ‘Mainland’ team that traveled to San Francisco, California to participate in exhibition matches versus a British Columbia ‘Island’ team as well as a San Francisco team a few days later. These were the first lacrosse games played in that city and attracted considerable attention from the locals.

Archie Macnaughton managed the New Westminster Salmonbellies in 1900 and he took his team back east on tour. He was later the manager of the Vancouver Lacrosse Club in 1908 and 1910.

(PHOTO SOURCES: provided by Eric Zweig; CLHOF X994.15 excerpt; CLHOF X994.29 excerpt)

Archie Adamson

Archie Adamson, ca.1911
Archie Adamson, ca.1911

ARCHIE ADAMSON
(born January 1882 ? – deceased)

Toronto Lacrosse Club (1902-1903)
Toronto Chippewas (1904-ca.1905)
Toronto Tecumsehs (ca.1905-1909)
Vancouver Lacrosse Club (1910-1911; 1913; 1918)

Archie Adamson was born in Hamilton, Ontario but always played with Toronto teams until moving to the Coast.

He first played lacrosse as a youngster with Wellesley School in the junior public school league, winning the championship that year. He then played for the Checkers team in the junior city league, winning championships in two years.

His senior lacrosse career began around 1902, when he was listed as a member of the Toronto Lacrosse Club team, in the National Lacrosse Union, that went to England that year. He was originally one of the two spares to be taken on the trip but then landed a roster spot of his own when one of the regular players had to withdraw before setting sail for the old country. During these early years playing in Toronto, Adamson acquired the nickname ‘Kid’.

Adamson then changed teams and leagues when he played for Toronto Chippewas of Canadian Lacrosse Association in 1904 and 1905. He finished in the top-ten for scoring in his first season with the Chippewas when he scored 10 goals and 11 points in 11 games – second-best in scoring for the team and accounting for almost one-third of the Chippewas’ goal production.

There is confusion determining exactly which Toronto club Archie Adamson played for in 1905. Some sources have him with the Chippewas while others have him with the Toronto Tecumsehs – both teams competed in the Canadian Lacrosse Association league that year. What is known is he scored 15 goals that season, which considering how awful the last-place Chippewas offense was (only 25 goals to their credit for the entire season), it seems more likely that he was with the second-place Tecumsehs.

The following season, he helped the Toronto Tecumsehs win the National Lacrosse Union championship, finishing eighth in league scoring with 16 goals and 23 points. He continued to have two more solid campaigns with the Tecumsehs and picked up a second league championship with them in 1908. He finished fifth in scoring in 1907, with 23 goals and 26 points in 12 games, and then led the Tecumsehs in scoring in their 1908 championship year with 22 goals and 26 points. Adamson then saw his play drop off the scoring charts in 1909 as Toronto slid downwards into fourth in the seven-team loop.

When the Tecumsehs came west in June 1909 to challenge the New Westminster Salmonbellies for the Minto Cup, Adamson made the trip. He scored the final goal of the first game as Toronto dropped a 6-4 decision. Adamson then bagged a hat-trick in the second game played three days later when the Salmonbellies took the second game by a narrow 6-5 win and won the series and the Minto Cup by only 3 goals aggregate.

Archie Adamson rebounded on the field the following year when he went west in 1910 to sign with Con Jones and the Vancouver Lacrosse Club. While Vancouver struggled as a team all season long, managing just 3 wins in 11 league games, Adamson scored 8 goals from the midfield – which were enough to see him place second in team scoring, 2 goals behind the leader ‘Bones’ Allen.

1911 saw him moved up as a forward to the outside home position on the enemy crease – his old familiar position back when he was with the Tecumsehs – and found himself alongside the legendary ‘Newsy’ Lalonde. Adamson replicated his eight-goal effort and finished third in goals for Vancouver Lacrosse Club. He won his only Minto Cup professional championship that season, which involved Vancouver defending a challenge from his old Toronto Tecumsehs team-mates who held him scoreless in both matches played at Recreation Park in downtown Vancouver.

There is no information where he played in 1912 except that it was not in the professional British Columbia Lacrosse Association. Adamson returned to the Vancouver Lacrosse Club in 1913 but soon lost favour with his boss; he found himself released by Vancouver in June 1913 after Con Jones became disgusted with the play of the veteran. He had only managed 2 goals in 4 games occupying ‘Newsy’ Lalonde’s old spot on the attack.

Adamson made a mid-season comeback with Vancouver in 1918 when lacrosse resumed play on the Coast after a two-year hiatus due to the Great War – mirroring his lackluster efforts from five years ago by scoring 2 goals in 4 games. Vancouver would win the Mainland Lacrosse Association championship and with it a disputed Minto Cup championship but Adamson did not play in the final month of the season. It is unknown whether he was still a member of the team by that point.

In his four seasons played on the Pacific Coast, Archie Adamson appeared in 29 games for Vancouver Lacrosse Club and scored 20 goals. He had 2 penalties in 1911 which accrued 10 minutes against his name.

1918 appears to have been his last season – certainly at the highest level of the game – and after leaving the game for good, his subsequent whereabouts are unknown but Adamson most likely stayed on the Coast. His name was noted by the newspapers as one of the pallbearers at the funeral of former teammate Johnny Howard, which was held in Vancouver in 1937.

(PHOTO SOURCE: detail from postcard of 1911 Vancouver team)

archie adamson stats